Contextualizing COVID-19 in the NY City Region: a Comparative Approach

Text and data visualizations by Jesse W. Torgerson; data collection by Rachel Chung (’20) and Ezra Kohn (’20); mapping by Grant van Inwegen (’20) and Jesse Simmons (’21) with assistance from Kim Diver. Please see our introductory post. The Traveler’s Lab at Wesleyan University has applied our movement-focused approach to … Continue…

COVID-19 in the NYC Commuting Region: A Travelers’ Lab Study

Updated: April 30, 2020. Follow-up post (5/12/2020) here. by Rachel Chung, Grant van Inwegen, Ezra Kohn, Jesse Simmons, and Jesse W. Torgerson The Traveler’s Lab at Wesleyan University studies the movement of people and objects during the middle ages. Our focus on travel brings overlooked and unrecognized realities to standard … Continue…

Rewriting the Historical Geography of Rome with the Chronicle of Theophanes

Text by Rachel Chung (’20), Grant van Inwegen (’20), Ezra Kohn (’20), Nathan Krieger (’20), and Jonah Skolnik (’21). Mapping by Jesse Simmons (’21) and Grant van Inwegen (’20). Data visualizations by Weiliang Song (’20) with assistance from Rachel Chung (’20). This blog post presents a paper that the Theophanes … Continue…

Geography and Narrative in Chronicle of Theophanes: 2018-2019 Resumé

by Nathan Krieger (Wesleyan ’20) This project, using quantitative methods to study the role of geography through the narrative of the ninth-century Chronicle of Theophanes, took some significant steps in 2018-2019. Our aim has been to analyze this text using new tools and new methodologies including MAXQDA, Recogito, and both … Continue…

Sonification and the Datini Letter Meta-data

Written by Adam Franklin-Lyons (History professor at Marlboro College) and Logan Davis (Research and Development Engineer at Pairity Greater Boston Area Computer Software) Which means what exactly?  It’s like a visualization, but instead of something you see, it’s something you hear.  Let me start with a little background… A couple … Continue…

A New GitHub Data-Set

Written by Adam Franklin-Lyons In earlier articles on this blogroll, we have written a couple of times about extracting, analyzing and organizing medieval itineraries as a source of data for doing geographic studies of medieval movement and travel (see: “Itineraries, Gazetteers, and Roads” and “Notes on the Margins“). Currently we … Continue…

Itineraries, Gazetteers, and Roads – a newsletter article

At the end of last year, I wrote a short article for the Newsletter of the Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies.  The article talks about our ongoing itinerary project, focusing both on some of the itineraries I have been working on in Spain, but also talks about the … Continue…

Anti-Jewish Riots and Royal Communication Networks in Aragon

Royal Communication Networks in Aragon During Anti-Jewish Riots : 1391-1392 by Kaitlyn Thomas-Franz Introduction This past semester I had the opportunity to work with Professor Franklin Lyons on an exploratory data analysis project relating to a series of anti-Jewish riots that occurred in the crowns of Castile and Aragon between … Continue…

Constantinople as Palimpsest: Now with Words!

Our beta-version of the Constantinople as Palimpsest (a modest encyclopedia of Byzantium) has now had a few issues corrected and has been updated. Introductory essays now explain each of the different categories of analysis that were generated by the Traveler’s Lab researchers and students of COL 128 in Spring of … Continue…

Turning Geographic References into Maps with Recogito: Part 2 (of 2)

By Caroline Diemer (Wesleyan ’18) (introductory note by Jesse W. Torgerson) This blog post is the second part of a description of our work to see what the “geographic references” that we generated from the Chronicle of Theophanes the Confessor using MAXQDA looked like when projected onto maps. This is in … Continue…